ICT manager

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Description

The ICT manager will ensure the smooth operation of the ICT department in alignment with the business objectives of the organisation. The ICT manager will plan, direct, coordinate and design ICT-related activities, as well as provide administrative direction and support for daily operational activities of the ICT department.

The ICT manager will take an authoritative, pro-active approach in dealing with external vendors and outsourced development staff.  The role will manage and balance the expectations of the business within the framework of staff and resource limitations. The ICT manager will keep abreast of latest technologies that may be of benefit to the organisation and make requisite recommendations, supported by documentation, costing etc and present to business. 

The ICT manager will provide leadership to ICT operations and infrastructure ensuring that an appropriate technical support framework is in place, including the management and delivery of service support and service delivery.

The ICT manager will work closely with decision makers in other departments to identify, recommend, develop, implement, and support cost-effective technology solutions. As well as these responsibilities that ICT manager will define and implement ICT policies, procedures, and best practices. 

An ICT manager exhibits capabilities in line with the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA)[1] and the Queensland Public Service Workforce Capability Success Profile.[2]

Within the SFIA profile, the ICT manager has level 5 and 6 capabilities, i.e. ensures and advises on the skills outlined and initiates and influences their use. The SFIA profile is outlined below.

Autonomy

Has defined authority and accountability for actions and decisions within a significant area of work, including technical, financial and quality aspects. Establishes organisational objectives and assigns responsibilities.

Influence

Influences policy and strategy formation. Initiates influential relationships with internal and external customers, suppliers and partners at senior management level, including industry leaders. Makes decisions which impact the work of employing organisations, achievement of organisational objectives and financial performance.

Complexity

Has a broad business understanding and deep understanding of own specialism(s). Performs highly complex work activities covering technical, financial and quality aspects. Contributes to the implementation of policy and strategy. Creatively applies a wide range of technical and/or management principles.

Business Skills

Absorbs complex information and communicates effectively at all levels to both technical and non-technical audiences. Manages and mitigates risk. Understands the implications of new technologies. Demonstrates clear leadership. Understands and communicates industry developments, and the role and impact of technology in the employing organisation. Promotes compliance with relevant legislation. Takes the initiative to keep both own and colleagues' skills up to date.

 

  SFIA Skill

SFIA Skill Code

SFIA Skill Level of Responsibility

SFIA Skills Level Descriptor

Consultancy

CNSL

5

Takes responsibility for understanding client requirements, collecting data, delivering analysis and problem resolution. Identifies, evaluates and recommends options, implementing if required. Collaborates with, and facilitates stakeholder groups, as part of formal or informal consultancy agreements. Seeks to fully address client needs, enhancing the capabilities and effectiveness of client personnel, by ensuring that proposed solutions are properly understood and appropriately exploited.

IT management

ITMG

6

Identifies and manages resources needed for the planning, development and delivery of specified information and communications systems services (including data, voice, text, audio and images). Influences senior level customers and project teams through change management initiatives, ensuring that the infrastructure is managed to provide agreed levels of service and data integrity. Takes full responsibility for budgeting, estimating, planning and objective setting. Plans and manages implementation of processes and procedures, tools and techniques for monitoring and managing the performance of automated systems and services, in respect of their contribution to business performance and benefits to the business, where the measure of success depends on achieving clearly stated business/financial goals and performance targets. Monitors performance and takes corrective action where necessary.

Contract management

ITCM

6

Negotiates and resolves contractual issues, including failure to meet contractual obligations. Promotes change control processes and leads variation negotiations when necessary. Champions continuous improvement programmes, jointly developing strategies and incentives to enhance performance. Undertakes comprehensive financial evaluations. Ensures non-discriminatory behaviour and legal compliance. Ensures that lessons learned from reviews are documented and promoted with all stakeholders. Develops broad industry/ category credentials as ‘best practice’ champion.

 

Queensland Government roles align with the Queensland Public Service Workforce Capability Success Profile.

The success profile is a sector wide, one-government approach to the leadership behaviours expected of all public sector employees to support high performing workplaces.  The profile describes three performance dimensions (vision, results and accountability) and 13 leadership competencies required against four role types: 

  • Individual contributor (manages self)
  • Team leader (manages individuals)
  • Program manager (manages multiple teams/projects)
  • Executive (manages program managers)

When developing a Role Description, identify the role type and then focus on the most important attributes and create a balance between SFIA skills and leadership skills. 

Entry points

To have a career such as an ICT manager, a bachelor level degree in areas such as information technology, information systems or business is required.

Learning and development

Formal training and on the job experience are important ways to improve and develop the required skills.

 

  1. The Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) provides a common language that integrates with an organisation’s way of working, to improve capability and resource planning, resource deployment and performance management.  This role profile quotes extensively from the SFIA, under licence from the SFIA Foundation.  Information about the SFIA can be found at http://www.sfia-online.org/en
  2. The Queensland Public Service Workforce Capability Success Profile plays a key role in translating the government’s ‘talent management requirements’ into clear behavioural terms, while at the same time delivering organisational change and growth.  The success profile is being utilised to align sector-wide talent management strategies, including workforce planning, talent acquisition, leadership development, capability development, performance management, career management and succession planning.

http://www.psc.qld.gov.au/includes/assets/PSC_Workforce_Capability_Success_Profile.pdf

The supporting Companion Guide can be found at

http://www.psc.qld.gov.au/includes/assets/Companion_guide_QPS_Workforce_Capability_Success_Profile.pdf