Sales consultant

Print this role profile

Description

A sales consultant is responsible for selling computer hardware, software and ICT services, and ensuring they are aware of their customer’s ICT needs.

The sales consultant will spend time talking with clients and potential clients to gain a thorough understanding of how the products on offer can assist the business to work in a more efficient and effective manner.

The sales consultant will spend time researching new and innovative IT solutions and then matching these solutions to existing customers’ needs. The sales consultant will also ensure that potential clients are aware of new and innovative solutions.

The sales consultant will have a superior knowledge of the products they are selling so that they can assist the clients to learn how to use the products and so that they can provide a solid after sales service. The superior product knowledge allows the sales consultant to participate in product development activities and to relate customer concerns and queries back to the technical development staff of the sales company.

A sales consultant exhibits a combination of capabilities from the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA)[1] and from the Queensland Public Service Leadership competencies for Queensland Framework[2].

SFIA profile

Within the SFIA profile, the sales consultant has level 4 and 5 capabilities, i.e. enables, ensures and advises on the skills outlined below.

Refer to the framework for descriptions of the seven levels of responsibility and accountability.

SFIA skill

SFIA skill code

SFIA skill level of responsibility

SFIA skills level descriptor

Marketing

MKTG

5

Devises and manages marketing campaigns within specified budgets to meet specified objectives. Manages and monitors market research, analysis and the marketing planning process. Advises on brand management and promotion of corporate reputation and plays an active role in promoting engagement of staff and business partners. Takes overall responsibility for the production of marketing materials and staging of events. Finds innovative solutions to marketing problems. Uses experience and data to make informed recommendations to senior management, including market segmentation and customer loyalty. Reviews and reports on the effectiveness of marketing approaches and services and their impact on business outcomes.

Selling

SALE

4

Collects and uses information in order to achieve sales objectives. Responds to existing sales leads and identifies and qualifies new leads and prospects with a view to developing a pipeline of potential opportunities. Understands customer and needs, and develops and enhances customer relationships, before, during and after the conclusion of agreements/contracts. Key tasks may also include bid management, value analysis, negotiation, presentation and preparation of contracts. Monitors and reports on quota, performance, customer satisfaction, market intelligence and competitors.

Sales support

SSUP

5

Works closely with the sales team to ensure that customers are assisted and advised properly. Ensures that reliable cost, effort and risk estimates and project plans are produced. Manages all sales support activities, taking full responsibility for the technical content of bids and sales proposals. Establishes metrics to provide data on performance and help with the continuous improvement of sales support activities.

Leadership skills

Queensland Government roles align with the Leadership competencies for Queensland.

Leadership competencies for Queensland describes what highly effective, everyday leadership looks like in the sector. In simple, action-oriented language, it provides a common understanding of the foundations for success across all roles. The profile describes three performance dimensions (vision, results and accountability) and 11 leadership competencies required against five leadership streams.

Leadership streams are not connected to a level or classification, but rather reflect the balance between leadership and technical skills required of an individual. Individuals can consider the ‘value proposition’ of roles rather than the traditional lens of hierarchical structures or classification levels. The five leadership streams are:

  • Individual contributor (Leads self and does not supervise others)
  • Team leader (leads a team and typically reports to a program leader)
  • Program leader (leads team leaders and/or multiple areas of work)
  • Executive (leads program leaders or other executives)
  • Chief executive (leads the organisation).

When developing a role description, identify the role type and then focus on the most important attributes and create a balance between SFIA skills and leadership skills.

Entry points

While a formal tertiary qualification is not required for this role, a detailed technical understanding of IT is required. A degree level qualification in information technology would be considered highly advantageous


[1] The Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) provides a common language that integrates with an organisation’s way of working, to improve capability and resource planning, resource deployment and performance management. This role profile quotes extensively from the SFIA, under licence from the SFIA Foundation. Information about the SFIA can be found at http://www.sfia-online.org/en

[2] The Leadership competencies for Queensland framework plays a key role in translating the government’s ‘talent management requirements’ into clear behavioural terms. The competencies can be utilised in talent management strategies, including workforce planning, talent acquisition, leadership development, capability development, performance management, career management and succession planning. The competences can be accessed here Leadership competencies for Queensland


Last Reviewed: 22 July 2019