Software developer

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Description

A software developer is a person concerned with the facts of the software development process wider than design and coding, a somewhat broader scope of computer programming or a specialty of project managing including some aspects of software product management. This person may contribute to the overview of the project on the application level rather than component level or individual programming tasks.

A software developer could be involved in wider aspects of the software development process such as:

  • participation in software product definition, including business case or gap analysis
  • specification
  • requirements analysis
  • development and refinement of throw-away simulations or prototypes to confirm requirements
  • feasibility and cost-benefit analysis, including the choice of application architecture and framework, leading to the budget and schedule for the project
  • design
  • implementation (e.g. installation, configuration, programming/customisation, integration, data migration)
  • authoring of documentation needed by users and implementation partners etc.
  • testing, including defining/supporting acceptance testing and gathering feedback from pre-release testers
  • participation in software release and post-release activities, including support for product launch evangelism (e.g. developing demonstrations and/or samples) and competitive analysis for subsequent product build/release cycles and
  • maintenance.

Software developers are often still guided by lead programmers but also encompasses the class of freelance software developers.

A software developer exhibits a combination of capabilities from the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA)[1] and from the Queensland Public Service Leadership competencies for Queensland Framework[2].

SFIA profile

Within the SFIA profile, the account manager has level 4 and 5 capabilities, i.e. enables, ensures and advises on the skills outlined below.

Refer to the framework for descriptions of the seven levels of responsibility and accountability.

SFIA skill

SFIA skill code

SFIA skill level of responsibility

SFIA skills level descriptor

Systems development management

DLMG

5

Defines systems development projects which support the organisation's objectives and plans. Selects, adopts and adapts appropriate systems development methods, tools and techniques selecting appropriately from predictive (plan-driven) approaches or adaptive (iterative/agile) approaches. Ensures that senior management is both aware of and able to provide the required resources. Facilitates availability and optimum utilisation of resources. Monitors and reports on the progress of development projects, ensuring that projects are carried out in accordance with agreed architectures, standards, methods and procedures (including secure software development). Develops road maps to communicate future development activity.

Programming / software development

PROG

4

Designs, codes, verifies, tests, documents, amends and refactors complex programs/scripts and integration software services. Contributes to selection of the software development approach for projects, selecting appropriately from predictive (plan-driven) approaches or adaptive (iterative/agile) approaches. Applies agreed standards and tools, to achieve well-engineered outcomes. Participates in reviews of own work and leads reviews of colleagues' work.

Testing

TEST

4

Accepts responsibility for creation of test cases using own in-depth technical analysis of both functional and non-functional specifications (such as reliability, efficiency, usability, maintainability and portability). Creates traceability records, from test cases back to requirements. Produces test scripts, materials and regression test packs to test new and amended software or services. Specifies requirements for environment, data, resources and tools. Interprets, executes and documents complex test scripts using agreed methods and standards. Records and analyses actions and results, and maintains a defect register. Reviews test results and modifies tests if necessary. Provides reports on progress, anomalies, risks and issues associated with the overall project. Reports on system quality and collects metrics on test cases. Provides specialist advice to support others.

Specialist advice

TECH

5

Actively maintains recognised expert level knowledge in one or more identifiable specialisms. Provides definitive and expert advice in their specialist area(s). Oversees the provision of specialist advice by others, consolidates expertise from multiple sources, including third party experts, to provide coherent advice to further organisational objectives. Supports and promotes the development and sharing of specialist knowledge within the organisation.

Software design

SWDN

4

Designs software components and modules using appropriate modelling techniques following agreed software design standards, patterns and methodology. Creates and communicates multiple design views to identify and balance the concerns of all stakeholders of the software design and to allow for both functional and non-functional requirements. Identifies and evaluates alternative design options and trade-offs. Recommends designs which take into account target environment, performance security requirements and existing systems. Reviews, verifies and improves own designs against specifications. Leads reviews of others’ designs. Models, simulates or prototypes the behaviour of proposed software to enable approval by stakeholders, and effective construction of the software. Verifies software design by constructing and applying appropriate methods.

Leadership skills

Queensland Government roles align with the Leadership competencies for Queensland.

Leadership competencies for Queensland describes what highly effective, everyday leadership looks like in the sector. In simple, action-oriented language, it provides a common understanding of the foundations for success across all roles. The profile describes three performance dimensions (vision, results and accountability) and 11 leadership competencies required against five leadership streams.

Leadership streams are not connected to a level or classification, but rather reflect the balance between leadership and technical skills required of an individual. Individuals can consider the ‘value proposition’ of roles rather than the traditional lens of hierarchical structures or classification levels. The five leadership streams are:

  • Individual contributor (Leads self and does not supervise others)
  • Team leader (leads a team and typically reports to a program leader)
  • Program leader (leads team leaders and/or multiple areas of work)
  • Executive (leads program leaders or other executives)
  • Chief executive (leads the organisation).

When developing a role description, identify the role type and then focus on the most important attributes and create a balance between SFIA skills and leadership skills.

Entry points

A degree level qualification in information technology or computer science are highly regarded in this field.


[1] The Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) provides a common language that integrates with an organisation’s way of working, to improve capability and resource planning, resource deployment and performance management. This role profile quotes extensively from the SFIA, under licence from the SFIA Foundation. Information about the SFIA can be found at http://www.sfia-online.org/en

[2] The Leadership competencies for Queensland framework plays a key role in translating the government’s ‘talent management requirements’ into clear behavioural terms. The competencies can be utilised in talent management strategies, including workforce planning, talent acquisition, leadership development, capability development, performance management, career management and succession planning. The competences can be accessed here Leadership competencies for Queensland


Last Reviewed: 22 July 2019