Strategic business planner

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Description

The strategic business planner is responsible for ensuring that there are plans in place for an organisation's future course. Strategic planning is the formal consideration of an organisation's future course.

The strategic business planner is responsible for knowing where the organisation stands (What do we do?), determining where the organisation is going, and how it will get there. The resulting document is called the ‘strategic plan’.

The strategic business planner is responsible for setting strategic objectives and defining a roadmap of ways to achieve those objectives. The strategic business planner is also responsible for ensuring that the strategies are embedded within the business operational plans and performance management plans.

The strategic business planner will work closely with other ICT staff such as the chief information officer, chief technology officer and ICT manager.

A strategic business planner exhibits a combination of capabilities from the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA)[1] and from the Queensland Public Service Leadership competencies for Queensland Framework[2].

SFIA profile

Within the SFIA profile, the strategic business planner has level 6 capabilities, i.e. initiates and influences the skills outlined below.

Refer to the framework for descriptions of the seven levels of responsibility and accountability.

SFIA skill

SFIA skill code

SFIA skill level of responsibility

SFIA skills level descriptor

Consultancy

CNSL

6

Manages provision of consultancy services, and/or management of a team of consultants. In own areas of expertise, provides advice and guidance to consultants and/or the client through involvement in the delivery of consultancy services. Engages with clients and maintains client relationships. Establishes agreements/contracts and manages completion and disengagement.

Strategic planning

ITSP

6

Sets policies, standards, and guidelines for how the organisation conducts strategy development and planning. Leads and manages the creation or review of a strategy which meets the requirements of the business. Develops, communicates, implements and reviews the processes which ensure that the strategic management is embedded in the management and operational plans of the organisation.

Requirements definition and management

REQM

6

Develops organisational policies, standards, and guidelines for requirements definition and management. Raises awareness and champions the importance and value of requirements management principles and the selection of appropriate requirements management lifecycle models. Drives adoption of, and adherence to, policies and standards. Develops new methods and organisational capabilities. Plans and leads scoping, requirements definition and priority setting for complex, strategic programmes.

Leadership skills

Queensland Government roles align with the Leadership competencies for Queensland.

Leadership competencies for Queensland describes what highly effective, everyday leadership looks like in the sector. In simple, action-oriented language, it provides a common understanding of the foundations for success across all roles. The profile describes three performance dimensions (vision, results and accountability) and 11 leadership competencies required against five leadership streams.

Leadership streams are not connected to a level or classification, but rather reflect the balance between leadership and technical skills required of an individual. Individuals can consider the ‘value proposition’ of roles rather than the traditional lens of hierarchical structures or classification levels. The five leadership streams are:

  • Individual contributor (Leads self and does not supervise others)
  • Team leader (leads a team and typically reports to a program leader)
  • Program leader (leads team leaders and/or multiple areas of work)
  • Executive (leads program leaders or other executives)
  • Chief executive (leads the organisation).

When developing a role description, identify the role type and then focus on the most important attributes and create a balance between SFIA skills and leadership skills.

Entry points

A degree level qualification in areas such as business or information technology is highly regarded.

Learning and development

There are a number of ways to develop and improve strategic business planning skills. Formal training and on-the-job experience are important ways to improve and develop the required skills.


[1] The Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA) provides a common language that integrates with an organisation’s way of working, to improve capability and resource planning, resource deployment and performance management. This role profile quotes extensively from the SFIA, under licence from the SFIA Foundation. Information about the SFIA can be found at http://www.sfia-online.org/en

[2] The Leadership competencies for Queensland framework plays a key role in translating the government’s ‘talent management requirements’ into clear behavioural terms. The competencies can be utilised in talent management strategies, including workforce planning, talent acquisition, leadership development, capability development, performance management, career management and succession planning. The competences can be accessed here Leadership competencies for Queensland


Last Reviewed: 22 July 2019

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